Furniture & Accessories

The expert guide to ethical vegan shopping for your home this Veganuary

Main image and left Suszi Saunders used Farrow & Ball vegan-friendly paints when decorating 
her London home, bought feather-free sofas and cushions and replaced wool rugs with cotton ones 

If you’re keen to get on board with Veganuary, take inspiration from our guide to super-stylish, cruelty-free interiors.

Humane house

Suszi Saunders used Farrow & Ball vegan-friendly paints when decorating her London home, bought feather-free sofas and cushions and replaced wool rugs with cotton ones 
Suszi Saunders used Farrow & Ball vegan-friendly paints when decorating her London home, bought feather-free sofas and cushions and replaced wool rugs with cotton ones 

Hypnotherapist and interior-design fan Suszi Saunders’ pictures of her cruelty-free home have gained her over 27,000 followers on Instagram, and earned her a Peta Vegan Home Award in 2018.

Since turning vegan just over two years ago, Suszi has been transforming her Victorian house in London, sourcing animal-free alternatives to replicate the Danish ‘hygge’  look at little extra cost. ‘Faux- leather or cotton rugs are often cheaper than leather and wool ones,’ she points out. ‘I’ve also used a lot of reclaimed materials like scaffolding  boards and copper pipes, and sourced vintage furniture  and accessories, such as  lights and mirrors.’

She believes people shouldn’t  be afraid to ask brands to modify their products. ‘I’ve contacted local artisans to see if they could custom-make me their products in a vegan-friendly fabric, and many have been more than happy to do so,’ she says.

MateLuca bed, from £1,667, and Tilda sofa, from £3,998. Love Your Home (love-your-home.co.uk)rial benefits

Luca bed, from £1,667, and Tilda sofa, from £3,998. Love Your Home (love-your-home.co.uk)

Interior-design duo Jordan Cluroe and Russell Whitehead, aka 2LG Studio, both became vegan recently, and their passion for cruelty-free living has crossed over into their work. Their recent collaboration with Love Your Home produced a furniture range featuring ethical cotton velvets and cotton/linen bouclé fabrics. They have also designed a workspace using materials such as cork and recycled plastic, and a leather-look cushion made from pineapple-leaf fibre. ‘Pineapple “leather” is an example of a material that has been developed from waste but is still beautiful,’ says Russell. The pair have also made changes in their own home, and insist that vegan-friendly options can look as stunning as traditional ones. ‘It’s about looking for good alternatives,’ says Russell.

Ethical paints

A kitchen painted in Bea, £18 for 750ml, Painthouse (painthouse.co.uk)
A kitchen painted in Bea, £18 for 750ml, Painthouse (painthouse.co.uk)

Vegan interior designer Chloe Bullock (materialiseinteriors.com) recommends the brand Painthouse: ‘Many people are surprised that most commercial paint includes animal-tested ingredients, but not those from this company’s vibrant range,’ she says. The brand also offers a free colour card with peelable, reusable colour swatches that you can stick straight  on the wall.

Home scents

Soy-wax candle, from £16, Earl of East London (earlofeastlondon.com)
Soy-wax candle, from £16, Earl of East London (earlofeastlondon.com)

For houses that smell as good  as they look, vegan-friendly candles are a good alternative to those made from paraffin wax or beeswax. Earl of East London’s range is made from soy wax with cotton wicks and comes in chic amber jars. The founders, Niko Dafkos and Paul Firmin, believe good design should go hand in hand with animal-friendly products. ‘We don’t use the words “cruelty-free” as we assume and believe it shouldn’t be any other way,’ they say.

Green and glamorous

A vegan bedroom by Deborah DiMare, with non-down bedding and a faux-leather bench
A vegan bedroom by Deborah DiMare, with non-down bedding and a faux-leather bench
 CREDIT:SANTIAGO BERNAL

Deborah DiMare, an interiors consultant and founder of the International Vegan Design Organisation, is leading what she calls a ‘vegan glam revolution’, to prove that  vegan design doesn’t have  to be just worthy, but can also be ‘luxurious, beautiful and easily accessible’.

Having created her own vegan furniture line, called Arthur Avenue, she has now written a coffee-table book, Vegan Interiors, full of ideas on how to achieve a stylish home  using furniture, fabrics and decor that don’t use wool, leather, silk, down, feathers,  fur or any other animal-based material. ‘No living thing, including humans, animals  and the planet, needs to be sacrificed for beautiful interiors,’ she says. ‘Vegan furnishings can be ultra-fabulous, and are often  less expensive too.’

[“source=telegraph.co.uk”]